CARL REINER, HOST

Depending on who you talk to, Carl Reiner is best known as a co-star on the legendary television program "Your Show of Shows" . . . or as the creator and co-star of "The Dick van Dyke Show" . . . or as The Interviewer of "The 2,000 Year Old Man". . . or as director of feature films, including "The Jerk," "All of Me'' and "Oh, God!". . . or as father of actor writer-director-producer Rob Reiner and husband of jazz vocalist Estelle Reiner. . . or as the recipient of twelve Emmy awards . . . or . . .

Born in the Bronx, Reiner is the son of a watchmaker. At Evander Childs High School, his interest was baseball, but at age sixteen he took a job as a machinist helper in the millinery trade. He simultaneously enrolled in drama school for eight months and landed a part as a second tenor in an updated version of "The Merry Widow."

Reiner subsequently served in World War II, first training as a radio operator in the Air Force, followed by an assignment to Georgetown University to study French in order to become an interpreter, then as a teletype operator in the Signal Corps and later as a comedian and actor with Maurice Evans' Special Services Entertainment Unit. He toured the Pacific for eighteen months in G.I. revues.

Upon his honorable discharge in 1946, he won the leading role in the national company of "Call Me Mister" and after three more years in various Broadway musicals, joined Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca on "Your Show of Shows."

In 1958, his first novel, "Enter Laughing" was published. An autobiographical work, the book chronicled Reiner's frustrations as a young machinist helper in the millinery trade and his eventual entry into show business. The book subsequently became the basis for a Broadway play (adapted by Joe Stein) and feature film (directed and co-produced by Reiner) of the same name.

In 1961, Reiner conceived "The Dick Van Dyke Show," which would become one of the most famous and best loved sitcoms in television history. Of course, audiences have never forgotten his co-starring role on the show as the toupee-wearing producer Alan Brady. That same year, he wrote his first feature film, "The Thrill of It All," for Doris Day and James Garner.

Reiner's other feature film credits as a director include: "The Comic," co-written by Reiner and Aaron Ruben; "Where's Poppa?," which starred George Segal and Ruth Gordon; "Oh, God!" starring George Burns; four films with actor Steve Martin: ''The Jerk," "Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid," "The Man With Two Brains" and "All of Me;" "Summer Rental" with John Candy; "The One and Only" with Henry Winkler; ''Summer School" with Mark Harmon; "Bert Rigby, You're A Fool," which Reiner also wrote; "Sibling Rivalry," with Kirstie Alley, "Fatal Instinct," with Armand Assante and Kate Nelligan, and "That Old Feeling," with Bette Midler and Dennis Farina.

Mr. Reiner and Mel Brooks released a CD and book with new material in October of 1997, entitled, "The 2000 Year Old Man In The Year 2000" (Harper-Collins Publisher and Rhino Records Distributer).

His motion picture acting credits include a starring role in "The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming" and featured or cameo roles in "It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," ''The Gazebo," "Generation," "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid, "The End," and "The Slums Of Beverly Hills."

His television acting credits include featured roles in "Beggars and Choosers," and "Family Law." His second novel, All Kinds of Love, was published in April, 1993. His third novel, Continue Laughing, was published in June, 1995. Mr. Reiner has a new book of short stories which was published in September of l999. The title is How Paul Robeson Saved My Life. and Other Mostly Happy Stories.

Reiner and his wife of 56 years, Estelle, are also parents of two other children: Annie Reiner, a poet-, painter-playwright-psychoanalyst; and Lucas Reiner, a painter-screenwriter-director. He calls all three of his children "terribly civilized, wonderful human beings."